Smithsonian

Document A

Document A “No stamped paper to be had,” CITY of NEW-YORK, October 31, 1765 (Philadelphia: Printed by Hall & Franklin, 1765). From An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera, Library of Congress.

AT a general Meeting of the Merchants of the City of New-York, trading to Great-Britain, at the House of Mr. George Burns, of the said City, Inn-holder, to consider what was necessary to be done in the present Situation of Affairs, with respect to the STAMP ACT, and the melancholy State of the North-American Commerce, so greatly restricted by the Impositions and Duties established by the late Acts of Trade: They came to the following Resolutions, viz. . . .

We the under-written, Retailers of Goods, do hereby promise and oblige ourselves not to buy any Goods, Wares, or Merchandizes, of any Person or Persons whatsoever, that shall be shipped from Great Britain, after the first Day of January next; unless the STAMP ACT shall be repealed—As Witness our Hands.

Modern Translation:

At a general meeting of the merchants of the city of New York, who trade with Great Britain, at the house of Mr. George Burns, of New York, inn keeper, to consider what was necessary to be done in the present state of affairs, with respect to the STAMP ACT, and the sad state of North American trade and the buying of goods, which is so greatly limited by the new rules and taxes established by the recent trade laws: They came to the following decisions. We, the signers (of this document), sellers of goods, do hereby promise and commit ourselves not to buy any goods, wares, or merchandise, from any person or persons whatsoever, that are shipped from Great Britain, after the first of January next; unless the STAMP ACT is repealed—As witnessed by our signatures.