Smithsonian

Document B

“No stamped paper to be had,” BOSTON, October 28, 1765 (Philadelphia: Printed by Hall & Franklin, 1765). From An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera, Library of Congress.

WE hear from Halifax, in the province of Nova-Scotia, that on Sunday, the 13th inst. In the morning, was discovered hanging on the gallows behind the Citadel Hill, the effigies of a stampman, accompanied with a boot and devil, . . . this we are informed gave great pleasure and satisfaction to all the friends of liberty and their country there, as they hope from this instance of their zeal, the neighbouring colonies will be charitable enough to believe that nothing but their dependent situation, prevents them from heartily and sincerely opposing a tax unconstitutional in its nature, and of so destructive a tendency as must infallibly entail poverty and beggary on us and our posterity, if carried in execution.

Modern Translation:

We, in Philadelphia, hear from Halifax, Nova Scotia, a colony in Canada, that on Sunday, the 13th, in the morning, the figure of a stamp official was discovered hanging with a boot and devil behind the Citadel Hill . . . This, we are informed, gave great pleasure and satisfaction to all the friends of liberty in the colony of Nova Scotia, as the people there hope from this example of their zeal (enthusiasm), the neighboring colonies in America will be kind enough to believe that nothing but Nova Scotia’s dependence on Great Britain prevents them from heartily and sincerely opposing a tax that is unconstitutional in its nature, and that is so destructive that it must surely bring poverty on us and our families, if it is carried out.