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Pennsylvania Gazette, Nov 7, 1765, transcription
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In this letter, Boston merchant John Andrews makes reference to the Coercive Acts of 1774 (called the Intolerable Acts in the colonies), which were passed in response to the Boston Tea Party and other revolts against taxes and duties in Boston. These acts included the closing of the Boston port, the prohibition of town meetings, and the mandatory quartering of British soldiers in private homes. The acts outraged the colonists and effectively shut down commercial activity in Boston.
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Speaking for colonists in South Carolina, Sylvanus addresses the problem of taxation without representation in the American colonies. Although the colonists are regarded as British subjects, their interests are not spoken for in Parliament, and they are taxed without their consent or approval. This issue is to become one of the main issues of the American Revolution.
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This 1774 essay by loyalist Samuel Seabury illustrates the fact that popular opinion in the American Colonies was not uniform. While some colonists supported a revolution and independence, others clung to the hope that America would stay under British rule. In this writing, Seabury describes the strength of British forces and characterizes the impending revolution as a great mistake.
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The Mecklenburg Resolves, passed in North Carolina in May of 1775, declare the colony’s independence from Britain voiding all laws from Parliament or the King, calling for suspension of duties and arrest of royal officials in North Carolina, and calling for an independent, provincial government. These resolves, which were sent to the Second Continental Congress, represent a great step on the road to revolution.
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Janet Schaw, a Scot visiting her brother’s plantation in North Carolina, writes about the realities of British-imposed martial law on colonists. She describes the mandatory quartering, seizure of property, looting, and pillaging of British soldiers, who were given these powers as a way to combat growing colonial unrest.
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This petition, written on the eve of the Declaration of Independence, reaffirms the commitment of the Baptists of Prince William County, Virginia, to the cause of the revolutionaries. Using the rhetoric of religious freedom, the authors of this petition dispute the rule of the British, referring to the “enslaving scheme of a powerful enemy.” This document indicated the fact that motivation for revolution could be religious as well as economic and political.
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This essay by loyalist Charles Inglis is a response to Thomas Paine’s extremely successful pamphlet Common Sense. It takes an economic stance in arguing against the impending American Revolution. Inglis states that expenses would double if the American colonies achieved independence, and that the new nation would soon be left in debt. This work underscores the vast differences in opinion in the pre-Revolutionary colonies.
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Clergyman William Smith writes that the American colonies would do better to seek reconciliation rather than independence. A last-minute attempt to prevent the impending war, Smith argues that, in time, the colonies will again enjoy a prosperous and pleasant relationship with Great Britain.
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Pennsylvania Gazette, Nov 7, 1765, facsimile

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